TN 3 (10-99)

DI 34124.003 Cardiovascular Listings from 01/06/86 to 02/09/94

4.00 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

  1. Severe cardiac impairment results from one or more of three consequences of heart disease: (1) congestive heart failure; (2) ischemia (with or without necrosis) of heart muscle; (3) conduction disturbances and/or arrhythmias resulting in cardiac syncope.

    With diseases of arteries and veins, severe impairment may result from disorders of the vasculature in the central nervous system, eyes, kidneys, extremities, and other organs.

    The criteria for evaluating impairment resulting from heart diseases or diseases of the blood vessels are based on symptoms, physical signs and pertinent laboratory findings.

  2. Congestive heart failure is considered in the Listing under one category whatever the etiology (i.e., arteriosclerotic, hypertensive, rheumatic, pulmonary, congenital, or other organic heart diseases). Congestive heart failure is not considered to have been established for the purpose of 4.02 unless there is evidence of vascular congestion such as hepatomegaly or peripheral or pulmonary edema which is consistent with clinical diagnosis. (Radiological description of vascular congestion, unless supported by appropriate clinical evidence, should not be construed as pulmonary edema.) The findings of vascular congestion need not be present at the time of adjudication (except for 4.02A), but must be causally related to the current episode of marked impairment. The findings other than vascular congestion must be persistent.

    Other congestive, ischemic, or restrictive (obstructive) heart diseases such as caused by cardiomyopathy or aortic stenosis may result in significant impairment due to congestive heart failure, rhythm disturbances or ventricular outflow obstruction in the absence of left ventricular enlargement as described in 4.02B1. However, the ECG criteria as defined in 4.02B2 should be fulfilled. Clinical findings such as symptoms of dyspnea, fatigue, rhythm disturbances, etc., should be documented and the diagnosis confirmed by echocardiography or at cardiac catheterization.

  3. Hypertensive vascular disease does not result in severe impairment unless it causes severe damage to one or more of four end organs; heart, brain, kidneys, or eyes (retinae). The presence of such damage must be established by appropriate abnormal physical signs and laboratory findings as specified in 4.02 or 4.04, or for the body system involved.

  4. Ischemic heart diseases may result in a marked impairment due to chest pain. Description of the pain must contain the clinical characteristics as discussed under 4.00E. In addition, the clinical impression of chest pain of cardiac origin must be supported by objective evidence as described under 4.00F., G., or H.

  5. Chest pain of cardiac origin is considered to be pain which is precipitated by effort and promptly relieved by sublingual nitroglycerin or rapid-acting nitrates or rest. The character of the pain is classically described as crushing, squeezing, burning, or oppressive pain located in the chest. Excluded is sharp, sticking or rhythmic pain. Pain occurring on exercise should be described specifically as to usual inciting factors (kind and degree), character, location, radiation, duration, and responses to nitroglycerin or rest.

    So-called “anginal equivalent” locations manifested by pain in the throat, arms, or hands have the same validity as the chest pain described above. Status anginosus and variant angina of the Prinzmetal type (e.g., rest angina with transitory ST elevation on electrocardiogram) will be considered to have the same validity as classical angina pectoris as described above. Shortness of breath as an isolated finding should not be considered as an anginal equivalent.

    Chest pain that appears to be of cardiac origin may be caused by noncoronary conditions. Evidence for the latter should be actively considered in determining whether the chest pain is of cardiac origin. Among the more common conditions which may masquerade as angina are gastrointestinal tract lesions such as biliary tract disease, esophagitis, hiatal hernia, peptic ulcer, and pancreatitis; and musculoskeletal lesions such as costochondritis and cervical arthritis.

  6. Documentation of electrocardiography.

    1. Electrocardiograms obtained at rest must be submitted in the original or a legible copy of a 12-lead tracing, appropriately labeled, with the standardization inscribed on the tracing. Alteration in standardization of specific leads (such as to accommodate large QRS amplitudes) must be shown on those leads.

      The effect of drugs, electrolyte imbalance, etc., should be considered as possible noncoronary causes of ECG abnormalities, especially those involving the ST segment. If needed and available, pre-drug (especially pre-digitalis) tracings should be obtained.

      The term “ischemic” is used in 4.04 to describe a pathologic ST deviation. Nonspecific repolarization changes should not be confused with ischemic configurations or a current of injury.

      Detailed descriptions or computer interpretations without the original or legible copies of the ECG are not acceptable.

    2. Electrocardiograms obtained in conjunction with exercise tests must include the original tracings or a legible copy of appropriate leads obtained before, during and after exercise. Test control tracings, taken before exercise in the upright position, must be obtained. An ECG after 20 seconds of vigorous hyperventilation should be obtained. A posthyperventilation tracing may be essential for the proper evaluation of an “abnormal” test in certain circumstances, such as in women with evidence of mitral valve prolapse. A tracing should be taken at approximately 5 METs of exercise and at the time the ECG becomes abnormal according to the criteria in 4.04A. The time of onset of these abnormal changes must be noted, and the ECG tracing taken at the time should be obtained. Exercise histograms without the original tracings or legible copies are not acceptable.

      Whenever electrocardiographically documented stress test data are submitted, irrespective of the type, the standardization must be inscribed on the tracings and the strips must be labeled appropriately, indicating the times recorded. The degree of exercise achieved, the blood pressure levels during the test, and any reason for terminating the test must be included in the report.

  7. Exercise testing.

    1. When to purchase. Since the results of a treadmill exercise test are the primary basis for adjudicating claims under 4.04, they should be included in the file whenever they have been performed. There are also circumstances under which it will be appropriate to purchase exercise tests. Generally, these are limited to claims involving chest pain which is considered to be of cardiac origin but without corroborating ECG or other evidence of ischemic heart disease.

      Exercise tests should not be purchased in the absence of alleged chest pain of cardiac origin. Even in the presence of an allegation of chest pain of cardiac origin, an exercise test should not be purchased where full development short of such a purchase reveals that the impairment meets or equals any Listing or the claim can adjudicated on some other basis.

    2. Methodology. When an exercise test is purchased, it should be a treadmill type using a continuous progressive multistage regimen. The targeted heart rate should be not less than 85 percent of the maximum predicted heart rate unless it becomes hazardous to exercise to the heart rate or becomes unnecessary because the ECG meets the criteria in 4.04A at a lower heart rate (see also 4.00F.2.). Beyond these requirements, it is prudent to accept the methodology of a qualified, competent test facility. In any case, a precise description of the protocol that was followed must be provided.

    3. Limitations of exercise testing. Exercise testing should not be purchased for individuals who have the following: unstable progressive angina pectoris; recent onset (approximately 2 months) of angina; congestive heart failure; uncontrolled serious arrhythmias (including uncontrolled auricular fibrillation); second or third-degree heart block; Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome; uncontrolled marked hypertension; marked aortic stenosis; marked pulmonary hypertension; dissecting or ventricular aneurysms; acute illness; limiting neurological or musculoskeletal impairments; or for individuals on medication where performance of stress testing may constitute a significant risk.

      The presence of noncoronary or nonischemic factors which may influence the ECG response to exercise include hypokalemia, hyperventilation, vasoregulatory asthenia, significant anemia, left bundle branch block, and other heart disease, particularly valvular.

      Digitalis may cause ST segment abnormalities at rest, during, and after exercise. Digitalis-related ST depression, present at rest, may become accentuated and result in false interpretations of the ECG taken during or after exercise test.

    4. Evaluation. Where the evidence includes the results of a treadmill exercise test, this evidence is the primary basis for adjudicating claims under 4.04. For purposes of the Social Security disability program, treadmill exercise testing will be evaluated on the basis of the level at which the test becomes positive in accordance with the ECG criteria in 4.04A. However, the significance of findings of a treadmill exercise test must be considered in light of the clinical course of the disease which may have occurred subsequent to performance of the exercise test. The criteria in 4.04B are not applicable if there is documentation of an acceptable treadmill exercise test. If there is no evidence of a treadmill exercise test or if the test is not acceptable, the criteria in 4.04B should be used. The level of exercise is considered in terms of multiples of METs (metabolic equivalent units). One MET is the basal O2 requirement of the body in an inactive state, sitting quietly. It is considered by most authorities to be approximately 3.5 ml. O2/kg./min.

  8. Angiographic evidence.

    1. Coronary arteriography. This procedure is not to be purchased by the Social Security Administration. Should the results of such testing be available, the report should be considered as to the quality and kind of data provided and its applicability to the requirements of the Listing of Impairments. A copy of the report of the catheterization and ancillary studies should be obtained. The report should provide information as to the technique used, the method of assessing coronary lumen diameter, and the nature and location of any obstructive lesions.

      It is helpful to know the method used, the number of projections, and whether selective engagement of each coronary vessel was satisfactorily accomplished. It is also important to know whether the injected vessel was entirely and uniformly opacified, thus avoiding the artifactual appearance of narrowing or an obstruction.

      Coronary artery spasm induced by intracoronary catheterization is not to be considered as evidence of ischemic heart disease.

      Estimation of the functional significance of an obstructive lesion may also be aided by description of how well the distal part of the vessel is visualized. Some patients with significant proximal coronary atherosclerosis have well-developed large collateral blood supply to the distal vessels without evidence of myocardial damage or ischemia, even under conditions of severe stress.

    2. Left ventriculography. The report should describe the local contractility of the myocardium as may be evident from areas of hypokinesia, dyskinesia, or akinesia; and the overall contractility of the myocardium as measured by the ejection fraction.

    3. Proximal coronary arteries (see 4.04B7) will be considered as the:

      1. Right coronary artery proximal to the acute marginal branch; or

      2. Left anterior descending coronary artery proximal to the first septal perforator; or

      3. Left circumflex coronary artery proximal to the first obtuse marginal branch.

  9. Results of other tests. Information from adequate reports of other tests such as radionuclide studies or echocardiography should be considered where that information is comparable to the requirements in the listing. An ejection fraction measured by echocardiography is not determinative, but may be given consideration in the context of associated findings.

  10. Major surgical procedures. The amount of function restored and the time required to effect improvement after heart or vascular surgery vary with the nature and extent of the disorder, the type of surgery, and other individual factors. If the criteria described for heart or vascular disease are met, proposed heart or vascular surgery (coronary artery bypass procedure, valve replacement, major arterial grafts, etc.) does not militate against a finding of disability with subsequent assessment postoperatively.

    The usual time after surgery for adequate assessment of the results of surgery is considered to be approximately 3 months. Assessment of the magnitude of the impairment following surgery requires adequate documentation of the pertinent evaluations and tests performed following surgery, such as an interval history and physical examination, with emphasis on those signs and symptoms which might have changed post-operatively, as well as X-rays and electrocardiograms. Where treadmill exercise tests or angiography have been performed following the surgical procedure, the results of these tests should be obtained.

    Documentation of the preoperative evaluation and a description of the surgical procedure are also required. The evidence should be documented from hospital records (catheterization reports, coronary arteriographic reports, etc.) and the operative note.

    Implantation of a cardiac pacemaker is not considered a major surgical procedure for purposes of this section.

  11. Evaluation of peripheral arterial disease. The evaluation of peripheral arterial disease is based on medically acceptable clinical findings providing adequate history and physical examination findings describing the impairment, and on documentation of the appropriate laboratory techniques. The specific findings stated in Listing 4.13 represent the level of severity of that impairment; these findings, by themselves, are not intended to represent the basis for establishing the clinical diagnosis. The level of the impairment is based on the symptomatology, physical findings, Doppler studies before and after a standard exercise test, and/or angiographic findings.

    The requirements for evaluation of peripheral arterial disease in Listing 4.13B are based on the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle, determined by Doppler study, to the systolic blood pressure at the brachial artery determined at the same time. Results of plethysmographic studies, or other techniques providing systolic blood pressure determination at the ankle, should be considered where the information is comparable to the requirements in the listing.

    Listing 4.13B 1 provides for determining that the listing is met when the resting ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure ratio is less than 0.50. Listing 4.13B 2 provides additional criteria for evaluating peripheral arterial impairment on the basis of exercise studies when the resting ankle/ brachial systolic blood pressure ratio is 0.50 or above. The results of exercise studies should describe the level of exercise (e.g., speed and grade of the treadmill settings), the duration of exercise, symptoms during exercise, the reasons for stopping exercise if the expected level of exercise was not attained, blood pressures at the ankle and other pertinent levels measured after exercise, and the time required to return the systolic blood pressure toward or to, the preexercise level. When exercise Doppler studies are purchased by the Social Security Administration, it is suggested that the requested exercise be on a treadmill at 2 mph on a 12 percent grade for 5 minutes. Exercise studies should not be performed on individuals for whom exercise is contraindicated. The methodology of a qualified, competent facility should be accepted. In any case, a precise description of the protocol that was followed must be provided.

    It must be recognized that application of the criteria in Listing 4.13B may be limited in individuals who have severe calcific (Monckeberg's) sclerosis of the peripheral arteries or severe small vessel disease in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

4.01 CATEGORY OF IMPAIRMENTS, CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

4.02 Congestive heart failure (manifested by evidence of vascular congestion such as hepatomegaly, peripheral or pulmonary edema). With:

  1. Persistent congestive heart failure on clinical examination despite prescribed therapy; or

  2. Persistent left ventricular enlargement and hypertrophy documented by both:

    1. Extension of the cardiac shadow (left ventricle) to the vertebral column on a left lateral chest roentgenogram; and

    2. ECG showing QRS duration less than 0.12 second with Sv1 plus Rv5 (or Rv6 ) of 35 mm. or greater and ST segment depressed more than 0.5 mm. and low, diphasic or inverted T waves in leads with tall R waves, or

  3. Persistent “mitral” type heart involvement documented by left atrial enlargement shown by double shadow on PA chest roentgenogram (or characteristic distortion of barium-filled esophagus) and either:

    1. ECG showing QRS duration less than 0.12 second with Sv1 plus Rv 5 (or Rv6 ) of 35 mm. or greater and ST segment depressed more than 0.5 mm. and low, diphasic or inverted T waves in leads with tall R waves, or

    2. ECG evidence of right ventricular hypertrophy with R wave of 5.0 mm. or greater in lead V1 and progressive decrease in R/S amplitude from lead V 1 to V5 or V6 ; or

  4. Cor pulmonale (non-acute) documented by both:

    1. Right ventricular enlargement (or prominence of the right out-flow tract) on chest roentgenogram or fluoroscopy; and

    2. ECG evidence of right ventricular hypertrophy with R wave of 5.0 mm. or greater in lead V1 and progressive decrease in R/S amplitude from lead V1 to V5 or V6 .

4.03 Hypertensive vascular disease. Evaluate under 4.02 or 4.04 or under the criteria for the affected body system.

4.04 Ischemic heart disease with chest pain of cardiac origin as described in 4.00E. With:

  1. Treadmill exercise test (see 4.00F and G) demonstrating one of the following at an exercise level of 5 METs or less:

    1. Horizontal or downsloping depression (from the standing control) of the ST segment to 1.0 mm. or greater, lasting for at least 0.08 second after the J junction, and clearly discernible in at least two consecutive complexes which are on a level baseline in any lead; or

    2. Junctional depression occurring during exercise, remaining depressed (from the standing control) to 2.0 mm. or greater for at least 0.08 second after the J junction (the so-called slow upsloping ST segment), and clearly discernible in at least two consecutive complexes which are on a level baseline in any lead; or

    3. Premature ventricular systoles which are multiform or bidirectional or are sequentially inscribed (3 or more); or

    4. ST segment elevation (from the standing control) to 1 mm. or greater; or

    5. Development of second or third degree heart block; or

  2. In the absence of a report of an acceptable treadmill exercise test (see 4.00G), one of the following:

    1. Transmural myocardial infarction exhibiting a QS pattern or a Q wave with amplitude at least 1/3rd of R wave and with a duration of 0.04 second or more. (If these are present in leads III and aVF only, the requisite Q wave findings must be shown, by labeled tracing, to persist on deep inspiration); or

    2. Resting ECG findings showing ischemic-type (see 4.00F1) depression of ST segment to more than 0.5 mm. in either (a) leads I and aVL and V6 or (b) leads II and III and aVF or (c) leads V3 through V6 ; or

    3. Resting ECG findings showing an ischemic configuration or current of injury (see 4.00F1) with ST segment elevation to 2 mm. or more in either (a) leads I and aVL and V6 or (b) leads II and III and aVF or (c) leads V3 through V6 ; or

    4. Resting ECG findings showing symmetrical inversion of T waves to 5.0 mm. or more in any two leads except leads III or aVR or V1 or V2 ; or

    5. Inversion of T wave to 1.0 mm. or more in any of leads I, II, aVL, V 2 through V6 and R wave of 5.0 mm. or more in lead aVL and R wave greater than S wave in lead aVF; or

    6. “Double” Master Two-Step test demonstrating one of the following:

      1. Ischemic depression of ST segment to more than 0.5 mm. lasting for at least 0.08 second beyond the J junction and clearly discernible in at least two consecutive complexes which are on a level baseline in any lead; or

      2. Development of a second or third degree heart block; or

    7. Angiographic evidence (see 4.00H) (obtained independent of Social Security disability evaluation) showing one of the following:

      1. 50 percent or more narrowing of the left main coronary artery; or

      2. 70 percent or more narrowing of a proximal coronary artery (see 4.00H3) (excluding the left main coronary artery); or

      3. 50 percent or more narrowing involving a long (greater than 1 cm.) segment of a proximal coronary artery or multiple proximal coronary arteries; or

    8. Akinetic or hypokinetic myocardial wall or septal motion with left ventricular ejection fraction of 30 percent or less measured by contrast or radio-isotopic ventriculographic methods; or

  3. Resting ECG findings showing left bundle branch block as evidenced by QRS duration of 0.12 second or more in leads I, II, or III and R peak duration of 0.06 second or more in leads I, aVL, V5 or V6, unless there is a coronary angiogram of record which is negative (see criteria in 4.04B7).

4.05 Recurrent arrhythmias (not due to digitalis toxicity) resulting in uncontrolled repeated episodes of cardiac syncope and documented by resting or ambulatory (Holter) electrocardiography.

4.09 Myocardiopathies, rheumatic or syphilitic heart disease. Evaluate under the criteria in 4.02, 4.04, 4.05, or 11.04.

4.11 Aneurysm of aorta or major branches (demonstrated by roentgenographic evidence). With:

  1. Acute or chronic dissection not controlled by prescribed medical or surgical treatment; or

  2. Congestive heart failure as described under the criteria in 4.02; or

  3. Renal failure as described under the criteria in 6.02; or

  4. Repeated syncopal episodes.

4.12 Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremity with incompetency or obstruction of the deep venous return, associated with superficial varicosities, extensive brawny edema, stasis dermatitis, and recurrent or persistent ulceration which has not healed following at least 3 months of prescribed medical or surgical therapy.

4.13 Peripheral arterial disease. With:

  1. Intermittent claudication with failure to visualize (on arteriogram obtained independent of Social Security disability evaluation) the common femoral or deep femoral artery in one extremity; or

  2. Intermittent claudication with marked impairment of peripheral arterial circulation as determined by Doppler studies showing:

    1. Resting ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure ratio of less than 0.50; or

    2. Decrease in systolic blood pressure at ankle on exercise (see 4.00K) to 50 percent or more of preexercise level and requiring 10 minutes or more to return to preexercise level; or

  3. Amputation at or above the tarsal region due to peripheral arterial disease.


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DI 34124.003 - Cardiovascular Listings from 01/06/86 to 02/09/94 - 10/07/2015
Batch run: 10/07/2015
Rev:10/07/2015