TN 1 (06-15)

DI 34234.005 Immune Listings from 04/14/97 – 02/18/02

114.00 Immune System

A. Listed disorders include impairments involving deficiency of one or more components of the immune system (i.e., antibody-producing B cells; a number of different types of cells associated with cell-mediated immunity including T-lymphocytes, macrophages and monocytes; and components of the complement system).

B. Dysregulation of the immune system may result in the development of a connective tissue disorder. Connective tissue disorders include several chronic multisystem disorders that differ in their clinical manifestation, course, and outcome. These disorders are described in part A, 14.00B.

Some of the features of connective tissue disorders in children may differ from the features in adults. When the clinical features are the same as that seen in adults, the principles and concepts in part A, 14.00B apply.

The documentation needed to establish the existence of a connective tissue disorder is medical history, physical examination, selected laboratory studies, medically acceptable imaging techniques and, in some instances, tissue biopsy. However, the Social Security Administration will not purchase diagnostic tests or procedures that may involve significant risk, such as biopsies or angiograms. Generally, the existing medical evidence will contain this information.

In addition to the limitations caused by the connective tissue disorder per se, the chronic adverse effects of treatment (e.g., corticosteroid-related ischemic necrosis of bone) may result in functional loss.

A longitudinal clinical record of at least 3 months demonstrating active disease despite prescribed treatment during this period with the expectation that the disease will remain active for 12 months is necessary for assessment of severity and duration of impairment.

In children the impairment may affect growth, development, attainment of age-appropriate skills, and performance of age-appropriate activities. The limitations may be the result of loss of function or failure in a single organ or body system, or a lesser degree of functional loss in two or more organs/ body systems that, in combination with significant constitutional symptoms and signs of severe fatigue, fever, malaise, and weight loss, results in listing-level limitations. We use the term “severe” in these listings to describe medical severity; the term does not have the same meaning as it does when we use it in connection with a finding at the second step of the sequential evaluation processes in Sections 404.1520, 416.920, and 416.924.

C. Allergies, growth impairments and Kawasaki disease.

1. Allergic disorders (e.g., asthma or atopic dermatitis) are discussed and evaluated under the appropriate listing of the affected body system.

2. If growth is affected by the disorder or its treatment by immunosuppressive drugs, 100.00 may apply.

3. Kawasaki disease, also known as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, is characterized by multisystem manifestations, but significant functional impairment is usually due to disease of the coronary arteries, which should be evaluated under 104.00.

D. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

1. HIV infection is caused by a specific retrovirus and may be characterized by susceptibility to one or more opportunistic diseases, cancers, or other conditions, as described in 114.08. Any child with HIV infection, including one with a diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), may be found disabled under this listing if his or her impairment meets any of the criteria in 114.08 or is of equivalent severity to an impairment in 114.08.

2. Definitions. In 114.08, the terms "resistant to treatment," "recurrent," and "disseminated" have the same general meaning as used by the medical community. The precise meaning of any of these terms will depend upon the specific disease or condition in question, the body system affected, the usual course of the disorder and its treatment, and the other circumstances of the case.

"Resistant to treatment" means that a condition did not respond adequately to an appropriate course of treatment. Whether a response is adequate, or a course of treatment appropriate, will depend on the facts of the particular case.

"Recurrent" means that a condition that responded adequately to an appropriate course of treatment has returned after a period of remission or regression. The extent of response (or remission) and the time periods involved will depend on the facts of the particular case.

"Disseminated" means that a condition is spread widely over a considerable area or body system(s). The type and extent of the spread will depend on the specific disease.

3. Documentation of HIV infection in children. The medical evidence must include documentation of HIV infection. Documentation may be by laboratory evidence or by other generally acceptable methods consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice.

a. Documentation of HIV infection in children by definitive diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis of HIV infection in children is documented by one or more of the following laboratory tests:

i. For a child 24 months of age or older, a serum specimen that contains HIV antibodies. HIV antibodies are usually detected by a screening test. The most commonly used screening test is the ELISA. Although this test is highly sensitive, it may yield false positive results. Therefore, positive results from an ELISA must be confirmed by a more definitive test (e.g., Western blot, immunofluorescence assay). (See paragraph b, below, for information about HIV antibody testing in children younger than 24 months of age).

ii. A specimen that contains HIV antigen (e.g., serum specimen, lymphocyte culture, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen).

iii. An immunoglobulin A (IgA) serological assay specific for HIV.

iv. Other test(s) that are highly specific for detection of HIV in children (e.g., polymerase chain reaction (PCR)), or that are acceptable methods of detection consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge.

When laboratory testing for HIV infection has been performed, every reasonable effort must be made to obtain reports of the results of that testing.

b. Other acceptable documentation of HIV infection in children.

As noted in paragraph a, above, HIV infection is not documented in children under 24 months of age by a serum specimen containing HIV antibodies. This is because women with HIV infection often transfer HIV antibodies to their newborns. The mother's antibodies can persist in the infant for up to 24 months, even if the infant is not HIV-infected. Only 20 to 30 percent of such infants are actually infected. Therefore, the presence of serum HIV antibodies alone does not establish the presence of HIV infection in a child under 24 months of age. However, the presence of HIV antibodies accompanied by evidence of significantly depressed T-helper lymphocytes (CD4), an abnormal CD4/CD8 ratio, or abnormal immunoglobulin G (IgG) may be used to document HIV infection in a child under 24 months of age, even though such testing is not a basis for a definitive diagnosis.

For children from birth to the attainment of 24 months of age who have tested positive for HIV antibodies (see D3a above), HIV infection may be documented by one or more of the following:

i. For an infant 12 months of age or less, a CD4 (T4) count of 1500/mm3 or less, or a CD4 count less than or equal to 20 percent of total lymphocytes.

ii. For an infant from 12 to 24 months of age, a CD4 (T4) count of 750/mm3 or less, or a CD4 count less than or equal to 20 percent of total lymphocytes.

iii. An abnormal CD4/CD8 ratio.

iv. An IgG significantly greater than or less than the normal range for age.

HIV infection in children may also be documented without the definitive laboratory evidence described in paragraph a, or the other laboratory evidence discussed above, provided that such documentation is consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice and is consistent with the other evidence. If such laboratory evidence is not available, HIV infection may be documented by the medical history, clinical and laboratory findings, and diagnosis(es) indicated in the medical evidence. For example, a diagnosis of HIV infection in children will be accepted without definitive laboratory evidence if the child has an opportunistic disease (e.g., Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP)) predictive of a defect in cell-mediated immunity, and there is no other known cause of diminished resistance to that disease (e.g., long-term steroid treatment, lymphoma). In such cases, every reasonable effort must be made to obtain full details of the history, medical findings, and results of testing.

4. Documentation of the manifestations of HIV infection in children. The medical evidence must also include documentation of the manifestations of HIV infection in children. Documentation may be by laboratory evidence or by other generally acceptable methods consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice.

a. Documentation of the manifestations of HIV infection in children by definitive diagnosis.

The definitive method of diagnosing opportunistic diseases or conditions that are manifestations of HIV infection in children is by culture, serological test, or microscopic examination of biopsied tissue or other material (e.g., bronchial washings). Therefore, every reasonable effort must be made to obtain specific laboratory evidence of an opportunistic disease or other condition whenever this information is available. If a histological or other test has been performed, the evidence should include a copy of the appropriate report. If the report is not obtainable, the summary of hospitalization or a report from the treating source should include details of the findings and results of the diagnostic studies (including radiographic studies) or microscopic examination of the appropriate tissues or body fluids.

Although a reduced CD4 lymphocyte count in a child may show that there is an increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and diseases, that alone does not document the presence, severity, or functional effects of a manifestation of HIV infection in a child.

b. Other acceptable documentation of the manifestations of HIV infection in children.

Manifestations of HIV infection in children may also be documented without the definitive laboratory evidence described in paragraph a, provided that such documentation is consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice and is consistent with the other evidence. If no definitive laboratory evidence is available, manifestations of HIV infection may be documented by medical history, clinical and laboratory findings, and diagnosis(es) indicated in the medical evidence. In such cases, every reasonable effort must be made to obtain full details of the history, medical findings, and results of testing.

Documentation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease (114.08D) presents special problems because diagnosis requires identification of viral inclusion bodies or a positive culture from the affected organ, and the absence of any other infectious agent. A positive serology test identifies infection with the virus, but does not confirm a disease process. With the exception of chorioretinitis (which may be diagnosed by an ophthalmologist), documentation of CMV disease requires confirmation by biopsy or other generally acceptable methods consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice.

5. HIV infection in children. The clinical manifestation and course of disease in children who become infected with HIV perinatally or in the first 6 years of life may differ from that in older children and adults. In addition, survival times are shorter for children infected in the first year of life compared to those who become infected as older children or as adults. Infants may present with failure to thrive or pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP); young children may present with recurrent infections, neurological problems, or developmental abnormalities. Older children may also exhibit neurological abnormalities, such as HIV encephalopathy, or failure to thrive.

The methods of identifying and evaluating neurological abnormalities may vary depending on a child's age. For example, in an infant, impaired brain growth can be documented by a decrease in the growth rate of the head. In older children, impaired brain growth can be documented by brain atrophy on a CAT scan. Neurological abnormalities can also be observed in a younger child in the loss of previously acquired, or marked delays in achieving, developmental milestones. In an older child, this type of neurological abnormality would generally be demonstrated by the loss of previously acquired intellectual abilities. Although loss of previously acquired intellectual abilities can be documented by a decrease in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores or demonstrated if a child forgets information he or she previously learned, it can also be shown if the child is unable to learn new information. This could include the sudden acquisition of a new learning disability.

Children with HIV infection may contract any of a broad range of bacterial infections. Certain major infections caused by pyogenic bacteria; e.g., some pneumonias, can be severely limiting, especially in pre-adolescent children. These major bacterial infections should be evaluated under 114.08A5, which requires two or more such infections within a 2-year period. Although 114.08A5 applies only to children less than 13 years of age, an older child may be found to have an impairment of equivalent severity if the circumstances of the case warrant (e.g., delayed puberty).

Otherwise, bacterial infections are evaluated under 114.08A6. The criteria of the listing are met if one or more bacterial infection(s) occurs and requires hospitalization or intravenous antibiotic treatment 3 or more times in 1 year. Pelvic inflammatory disease in older female children should be evaluated under multiple or recurrent bacterial infections (114.08A6).

6. Evaluation of HIV infection in children. The criteria in 114.08 do not describe the full spectrum of diseases or conditions manifested by children with HIV infection. As in any case, consideration must be given to whether a child's impairment(s) meets, medically equals, or functionally equals the severity of any other listing in appendix 1 of subpart P; e.g., a neoplastic disorder listed in 113.00ff. (See §§404.1526, 416.926, and 416.926a.) Although 114.08 includes cross-references to other listings for the more common manifestations of HIV infection, additional listings may also apply.

In addition, the impact of all impairments, whether or not related to the HIV infection, must be considered. Children with HIV infection may manifest signs and symptoms of a mental impairment (e.g., anxiety, depression), or of another physical impairment. Medical evidence should include documentation of all physical and mental impairments and the impairment(s) should be evaluated not only under the relevant listing(s) in 114.08, but under any other appropriate listing(s).

It is also important to remember that children with HIV infection, like all others, are evaluated under the full sequential evaluation process described in DI 25201.005. If a child with HIV infection is working and engaging in substantial gainful activity (SGA), or does not have a severe impairment, the case will be decided at the first or second step of the sequential evaluation process, and does not require evaluation under these listings. For a child with HIV infection who is not engaging in SGA and has a severe impairment, but whose impairment(s) does not meet the criteria of a listing, consideration will be given to whether the child's impairment or combination of impairments is either medically or functionally equivalent in severity to any listed impairment.

7. Effect of treatment. Medical treatment must be considered in terms of its effectiveness in ameliorating the signs, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities of the specific disorder, or of the HIV infection itself (e.g. antiretroviral agents) and in terms of any side effects of treatment that may further impair the child.

Response to treatment and adverse or beneficial consequences of treatment may vary widely. For example, a child with HIV infection who develops otitis media may respond to the same antibiotic regimen used in treating children without HIV infection, but another child with HIV infection may not respond to the same regimen. Therefore, each case must be considered on an individual basis, along with the effects of treatment on the child's ability to function.

A specific description of the drugs or treatment given (including surgery), dosage, frequency of administration, and a description of the complications or response to treatment should be obtained. The effects of treatment may be temporary or long-term. As such, the decision regarding the impact of treatment should be based on a sufficient period of treatment to permit proper consideration.

8. Functional criteria. Paragraph O of 114.08 establishes standards for evaluating manifestations of HIV infection that do not meet the requirements listed in 114.08A-N. Paragraph O is applicable for manifestations that are not listed in 114.08A-N, as well as those listed in 114.08A-N that do not meet the criteria of any of the rules in 114.08A-N.

For children with HIV infection evaluated under 114.08O, listing-level severity will be assessed in terms of the functional limitations imposed by the impairment. The full impact of signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings on the child's ability to function must be considered. Important factors to be considered in evaluating the functioning of children with HIV infection include, but are not limited to: symptoms, such as fatigue and pain; characteristics of the illness, such as the frequency and duration of manifestations or periods of exacerbation and remission in the disease course; and the functional impact of treatment for the disease, including the side effects of medication.

To meet the criteria in 114.08O, a child with HIV infection must demonstrate a level of restriction in either one or two (depending on the child's age) of the general areas of functioning applicable to the child's age group. (See 112.00C for additional discussion of these areas of functioning).

114.01 Category of Impairments, Immune System

114.02 Systemic lupus erythematosus

Documented as described in 14.00B1 and 114.00B, with:

A. One of the following:

1. Growth impairment, as described under the criteria in 100.00ff;

2. Musculoskeletal involvement, as described under the criteria in 101.00ff;

3. Muscle involvement, as described under the criteria in 14.05; 4. Ocular involvement, as described under the criteria in 102.00ff;

5. Respiratory involvement, as described under the criteria in 103.00ff;

6. Cardiovascular involvement, as described under the criteria in 104.00ff or 14.04D;

7. Digestive involvement, as described under the criteria in 105.00ff;

8. Renal involvement, as described under the criteria in 106.00ff;

9. Hematologic involvement, as described under the criteria in 107.00ff;

10. Skin involvement, as described under the criteria in 8.00ff;

11. Endocrine involvement, as described under the criteria in 109.00ff;

12. Neurological involvement, as described under the criteria in 111.00ff; or

13. Mental involvement, as described under the criteria in 112.00ff.

or

B. Lesser involvement of two or more organs/body systems listed in paragraph A, with significant, documented, constitutional symptoms and signs of severe fatigue, fever, malaise, and weight loss. At least one of the organs/body systems must be involved to at least a moderate level of severity.

114.03 Systemic vasculitis

As described under the criteria in 14.03 or, if growth impairment, as described under the criteria in 100.00ff.

114.04 Systemic sclerosis and scleroderma

Documented as described in 14.00B3 and 114.00B, and:

A. As described under the criteria in 14.04 or, if growth impairment, as described under the criteria in 100.00ff.

or

B. Linear scleroderma, with one of the following:

1. Fixed valgus or varus deformities of both hands, or both feet;

2. Marked destruction or marked atrophy of an extremity;

3. Facial disfigurement from hypoplasia of the mandible, maxilla, or zygoma resulting in an impairment as described under the criteria in 112.00ff; or

4. Seizure disorder, as described under the criteria in 111.00ff.

114.05 Polymyositis or dermatomyositis

Documented as described in14.00B4 and 114.00B, and:

A. As described under the criteria in 14.05.

or

B. With one of the following:

1. Multiple joint contractures;

2. Diffuse cutaneous calcification with formation of an exoskeleton; or

3. Systemic vasculitis as described under the criteria in 14.03.

114.06 Undifferentiated connective tissue disorder

As described under the criteria in 114.02 or 114.04.

114.07 Congenital immune deficiency disease

A. Hypogammaglobulinemia or dysgammaglobulinemia, with:

1. Documented, recurrent severe infections occurring 3 or more times within a 5-month period; or

2. An associated disorder such as growth retardation, chronic lung disease, collagen disorder or tumor. Evaluate according to the appropriate body system listing.

or

B. Thymic dysplastic syndromes (such as Swiss, diGeorge).

114.08 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. With documentation as described in 114.00D3 and one of the following:

A. Bacterial infections:

1. Mycobacterial infection (e.g., caused by M. avium-intracellulare, M. kansasii, or M. tuberculosis) at a site other than the lungs, skin, or cervical or hilar lymph nodes; or pulmonary tuberculosis resistant to treatment;

2. Nocardiosis;

3. Salmonella bacteremia, recurrent non-typhoid;

4. Syphilis or neurosyphilis--evaluate sequelae under the criteria for the affected body system (e.g., 102.00 Special Senses and Speech, 104.00 Cardiovascular System, 111.00 Neurological);

5. In a child less than 13 years of age, multiple or recurrent pyogenic bacterial infection(s) of the following types: sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, bone or joint infection, or abscess of an internal organ or body cavity (excluding otitis media or superficial skin or mucosal abscesses) occurring 2 or more times in 2 years; or

6. Other multiple or recurrent bacterial infection(s), including pelvic inflammatory disease, requiring hospitalization or intravenous antibiotic treatment 3 or more times in 1 year.

or

B. Fungal infections:

1. Aspergillosis;

2. Candidiasis, at a site other than the skin, urinary tract, intestinal tract, or oral or vulvovaginal mucous membranes; or candidiasis involving the esophagus, trachea, bronchi, or lungs;

3. Coccidioidomycosis, at a site other than the lungs or lymph nodes;

4. Cryptococcosis, at a site other than the lungs (e.g., cryptococcal meningitis); 5. Histoplasmosis, at a site other than the lungs or lymph nodes; or

6. Mucormycosis.

or

C. Protozoan or helminthic infections:

1. Cryptosporidiosis, isosporiasis, or microsporidiosis, with diarrhea lasting for 1 month or longer;

2. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or extrapulmonary pneumocystis carinii infection;

3. Strongyloidiasis, extra-intestinal; or

4. Toxoplasmosis of an organ other than the liver, spleen, or lymph nodes.

or

D. Viral infections:

1. Cytomegalovirus disease (documented as described in 114.00D4b) at a site other than the liver, spleen, or lymph nodes; or

2. Herpes simplex virus causing:

a. Mucocutaneous infection (e.g., oral, genital, perianal) lasting for 1 month or longer;

b. Infection at a site other than the skin or mucous membranes (e.g., bronchitis, pneumonitis, esophagitis, or encephalitis); or

c. Disseminated infection; or

3. Herpes zoster, either disseminated or with multidermatomal eruptions that are resistant to treatment;

4. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; or

5. Hepatitis, as described under the criteria of 105.05.

or

E. Malignant neoplasms:

1. Carcinoma of the cervix, invasive, FIGO stage II and beyond;

2. Kaposi's sarcoma with:

a. Extensive oral lesions;

b. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, or other visceral organs; or

c. Involvement of the skin or mucous membranes as described under the criteria of 114.08F; or

3. Lymphoma (e.g., primary lymphoma of the brain, Burkitt's lymphoma, immunoblastic sarcoma, other Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease); or

4. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anus.

or

F. Conditions of the skin or mucous membranes (other than described in B2, D2, or D3 above) with extensive fungating or ulcerating lesions not responding to treatment (e.g., dermatological conditions such as eczema or psoriasis, vulvovaginal or other mucosal candida, condyloma caused by human papillomavirus, genital ulcerative disease), or evaluate under the criteria in 108.00ff.

or

G. Hematologic abnormalities:

1. Anemia, as described under the criteria in 7.02;

2. Granulocytopenia, as described under the criteria in 7.15; or

3. Thrombocytopenia, as described under the criteria of 107.06 or 7.06.

or

H. Neurological manifestations of HIV infection (e.g., HIV encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy), as described under the criteria in 111.00ff, or resulting in one or more of the following:

1. Loss of previously acquired, or marked delay in achieving, developmental milestones or intellectual ability (including the sudden acquisition of a new learning disability);

2. Impaired brain growth (acquired microcephaly or brain atrophy - see 114.00D5); or

3. Progressive motor dysfunction affecting gait and station or fine and gross motor skills.

or

I. Growth disturbance, with:

1. An involuntary weight loss (or failure to gain weight at an appropriate rate for age) resulting in a fall of 15 percentiles from established growth curve (on standard growth charts) that persists for 2 months or longer;

2. An involuntary weight loss (or failure to gain weight at an appropriate rate for age) resulting in a fall to below the third percentile from established growth curve (on standard growth charts) that persists for 2 months or longer; 3. Involuntary weight loss greater than 10 percent of baseline that persists for 2 months or longer; or

4. Growth impairment as described under the criteria in 100.00ff.

or

J. Diarrhea, lasting for 1 month or longer, resistant to treatment, and requiring intravenous hydration, intravenous alimentation, or tube feeding.

or

K. Cardiomyopathy, as described under the criteria in 104.00ff or 11.04.

or

L. Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia/pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia (LIP/PLH complex), with respiratory symptoms that significantly interfere with age-appropriate activities, and that cannot be controlled by prescribed treatment.

or

M. Nephropathy, as described under the criteria in 106.00.

or

N. One or more of the following infections (other than described in A-M, above), resistant to treatment or requiring hospitalization or intravenous treatment 3 or more times in 1 year (or evaluate sequelae under the criteria for the affected body system):

1. Sepsis;

2. Meningitis;

3. Pneumonia;

4. Septic arthritis;

5. Endocarditis; or

6. Radiographically documented sinusitis.

or

O. Any other manifestation(s) of HIV infection (including any listed in 114.08A-N, but without the requisite findings, e.g., oral candidiasis not meeting the criteria in 114.08F, diarrhea not meeting the criteria in 114.08J, or any other manifestation(s), e.g., oral hairy leukoplakia, hepatomegaly), resulting in one of the following:

1. For children from birth to attainment of age 1 at least one of the criteria in paragraphs A-E of 112.12;

2. For children age 1 to attainment of age 3 at least one of the appropriate age-group criteria in paragraph B1 of 112.02; or

3. For children age 3 to attainment of age 18, at least two of the appropriate age-group criteria in paragraph B2 of 112.02. (See DI 24595.005.)


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