TN 20 (10-91)

NL 00804.207 Work Incentives

1650. Situation Where Used:

 

Use under caption 1926, “Things to Remember.” This introduces the enclosure, SSI RULES THAT HELP YOU WORK which is issued as an attachment to the SSA-L8025-U2, Notice of Award, and yearly thereafter for blind and disabled individuals between the ages of 14 and 65.

Would   (1)   like to work? If so, you should know about special Supplemental Security Income (SSI) rules. These rules can help   (2)   keep Medicaid and may help   (3)   keep getting some SSI even though   (4)   working. The enclosed fact sheet tells you more about special SSI rules for people who work.

  1. Choice 1 - you

    Choice 2 - Recipient's Name

     

  2. Choice 1 - you

    Choice 2 - her

    Choice 3 - him

     

  3. Choice 1 - you

    Choice 2 - her

    Choice 3 - him

     

  4. Choice 1 - you are

    Choice 2 - she is

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1651. Situation Where Used:

This is issued as an attachment to the SSA-L8025-U2, Notice of Award, and yearly thereafter for blind and disabled individuals between the ages of 14 and 65.

 

SSI RULES THAT HELP YOU WORK

 

Would you like to work? If so, you should know about special Supplemental Security Income (SSI) rules. These rules can help you keep Medicaid and may help you keep getting some SSI even though you are working.

 

How Your SSI May Change If You Work

 

If you work full-time or part-time and make $65 or less each month, your SSI will usually not change. As the money you earn from your job goes up, your SSI will go down. If you have no other income (money or support), you can earn up to  $(1)  a month and still get SSI.

If you are a disabled or blind student under age 22, you can earn up to $400 a month, but not more than $1,620 a year, and your SSI will usually not change.

Medicaid

If you get Medicaid, it will usually continue as long as you get SSI. If your SSI stops because you begin earning too much money, you can often keep getting Medicaid as long as the following are true:

  • You continue to be disabled or blind under our rules; and

  • You can't pay your bills without Medicaid.

We Don't Count Some Of Your Expenses

The earnings you use for some of your working expenses may not count as income. For example, we sometimes don't count earnings used to pay for transportation to and from work. Also, we don't count the cost of special equipment that helps you to work.

A Plan Can Help

You may be able to keep more of your SSI if you develop a special plan to support yourself. We call this a plan to achieve self-support (PASS). This plan lets you set aside money for a certain amount of time for a work goal. For example, you may set aside money to start a business, go to school, or get training for a job.

We don't count what you set aside when we figure your SSI. This can help keep you on SSI or help you get more SSI. A PASS may also help someone you know qualify for SSI.

If You Need Help Finding A Job

We can ask someone at your State vocational rehabilitation office to help you find a job or give you training.

If You Want To Know More

If you want to know more about these rules, contact any Social Security office and ask to speak to someone about work incentives.

Fill-in:

 

  1. To arrive at the monthly amount, do the following computation:

    Money Amount = (Individual CCM FBR x 2) +$84.99 +(Optional State Supplement for Independent Living for CCM, if any, x 2).


To Link to this section - Use this URL:
http://policy.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0900804207
NL 00804.207 - Work Incentives - 03/26/1999
Batch run: 01/27/2009
Rev:03/26/1999