TN 14 (09-10)

RM 10205.600 Enumeration-at-Entry

Citations:

20 CFR 422.103

A. Enumeration at Entry (EAE)

SSA has agreements with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of State (DoS) to assist SSA in enumerating immigrants admitted as lawful permanent residents (LPR). If an immigrant wishes to apply for an original SSN or a replacement SSN card under the EAE process, DoS collects enumeration data during the immigrant visa process, and electronically transmits the data to DHS. When the immigrant is admitted into the U.S., DHS electronically transmits the enumeration data to SSA so that an SSN can be assigned or a replacement card issued. The EAE process eliminates the need for an immigrant to file an SS-5 application at an SSA field office.

B. How immigrants apply for and receive an SSN card via EAE

  1. The person applies for an immigrant visa and Social Security Number (SSN) or replacement card at DoS by completing the Application for Immigrant Visa (Form DS-230 or DS-260). When DoS issues the person an immigrant visa, they provide a handout that instructs the immigrant to contact SSA if the SSN card is not received within three weeks after arrival in the U.S. Refer to the DoS handout in RM 10205.600I in this section.

  2. DoS electronically sends the information from the immigrant visa application to Customs and Border Protection (CBP), a component of DHS.

  3. When the immigrant arrives at a U.S. Port of Entry (POE) and is admitted by CBP, CBP updates the enumeration data from DoS, and electronically sends the data to U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS), another component in DHS.

  4. USCIS electronically sends the enumeration data to SSA via the EAE interface.

  5. After SSA receives the enumeration data via the EAE interface, SSA assigns original SSNs to immigrants or issues SSN replacement cards as appropriate. Prior to June 25, 2011, all original SSN cards issued via EAE were in the 729 to 733 series. Effective June 25, 2011, all original SSN cards will be issued randomly per RM 10201.050.

  6. SSA mails the card to the mailing address the immigrant supplied to CBP.

C. EAE applicant contacts SSA because they did not receive SSN card

If an immigrant contacts SSA and states that he or she requested an SSN card when applying for the immigrant visa, but has not received it, take the following action:

  1. Determine if an SSN was previously assigned to the immigrant.

  2. Establish the immigrant’s identity (see RM 10210.405 for establishing identity). Primary evidence of identity for an immigrant who requests an SSN as part of the immigration process is either a Machine Readable Immigrant Visa (MRIV) with temporary I-551 language or an I-551 Permanent Resident Card, commonly known as a green card.

NOTE: When the enumeration system cannot process an EAE record because it is an exception, (e.g. the sex code is not F or M or there are multiple spaces in the parent’s name) the record is placed on the enumeration pending file with the application status of “NOT COMPLETED.” The unprocessed EAE record stays on the pending file for up to 365 days and, if the discrepancy is not resolved, the record is dropped (see RM 10270.010 A.1).

D. EAE applicant requested a replacement card and provides previously-assigned SSN

If an immigrant indicates he or she was previously assigned an SSN and is able to provide the SSN, take the following action:

  1. Request a Numident query.

  2. If the cycle date (CYD) on the Numident query shows that the application was processed less than two weeks from the current date, inform the immigrant that he or she should receive the card in the mail shortly.

  3. If the CYD on the Numident query shows that the application was processed more than two weeks prior to the current date, take a new application and submit all necessary evidence. The SSNAP Special FO Processing, "non-receipt" option is not available for SSN cards issued as a result of an application submitted through EAE (see RM 10215.040B).

  4. If the Numident query shows that no EAE application was processed based on the immigrant's recent admission to the U.S., take the following action to locate a pending record in SSNAP:

    • Attempt to retrieve the pending EAE application in SSNAP using the SSN. If no record is found, search using the name and date of birth (DOB) shown on the immigration documents.

    • If you do not find a pending record, and different names are shown on the immigrant's visa or passport, search SSNAP for pending records using those names.

    • If you find a pending record, compare the immigrant's name, date of birth, gender, alien registration number (ARN), place of birth and parent's names to corresponding information on the pending SSNAP record to determine if the SSNAP record belongs to the applicant.

  5. If you determine that the pending record belongs to the immigrant, take action to complete the record (e.g., resolve the exception or investigate message (EM)). If the immigration documents, visa and/or passport documents show different names for the immigrant, these can be shown in the "name used at birth if different" and "other names used" fields on the NH Additional Information screen in SSNAP as appropriate.

  6. If you do not find a pending record that belongs to the immigrant, start a new application in SSNAP and have the immigrant submit all necessary evidence.

E. Immigrant does not know if an SSN was previously assigned or does not know the previous assigned SSN

In cases where the immigrant does not know if an SSN was previously assigned, or knows that an SSN was assigned but does not know the SSN, take the following action to locate the previous SSN:

  1. Request an Alpha-Index query using the name shown on the DHS documents. If a different name is shown on the visa or passport, request Alpha-Index queries using those names.

  2. If you locate possible SSNs for the immigrant, obtain Numident records for each SSN and compare the immigrant's name, date of birth, gender, alien registration number (ARN), place of birth and parent's names to corresponding information on the Numident record(s) to determine if the SSN(s) belongs to the immigrant.

  3. If you determine that an SSN belongs to the immigrant, follow the instructions in section RM 10205.600D. If you locate more than one SSN that belongs to the immigrant, and the SSNs are not listed as multiple SSNs on the Numidents involved, see RM 10220.400.

  4. If you do not locate an SSN that belongs to the immigrant, follow the instructions in section RM 10205.600F.

F. Immigrant applied for an original SSN, or a previously-assigned SSN cannot be located

If you do not find an SSN for the immigrant, or the immigrant filed for an original SSN on the visa application, take the following action:

  1. Go to SSNAP and select Retrieve Application. Search for a pending application using the name and date of birth on the immigration document. If you do not find a pending application using the name shown on the immigration documents, and a different name is shown on the visa or passport, search for records using these names. If a record is found, compare the immigrant's ARN to the ARN shown on the SSNAP record to determine if the application belongs to the applicant.

  2. If you find a match, take action to resolve the exception condition or resolve the EM. For information on resolving an EM-3, see RM 10270.050.

  3. If you do not find a pending record in SSNAP, start a new application and have the immigrant submit all necessary evidence.

G. Immigrant completes an SSN application but previously applied for an SSN through EAE

In some cases, an immigrant may complete an SSN application and fail to mention that he or she also applied for an SSN on the immigrant visa application. If you start to enter a new application, SSNAP may identify one or more pending applications based on the automatic SSN and/or name and date of birth search. If there is a pending record for the individual in SSNAP:

  1. SSNAP will provide a list of pending applications. Select the appropriate pending application.

    1. Compare the information on the pending record, (i.e., the name, DOB, ARN, place of birth, parents' names, and gender) with the documents submitted by the applicant.

    2. If you determine that the pending record belongs to the immigrant, continue to process the pending application in place of the new application completed by the immigrant.

  2. Immigration status must be verified through SAVE. If SAVE does not verify the immigration status, follow regular procedures for verifying the applicant's immigration status (see RM 10214.000).

  3. When an EAE application is updated and cleared by the FO, the SSN assigned is based on the zip code of the FO processing the SSN application (i.e., it is no longer considered an EAE record).

H. Management Information

Management information (MI) reports for cases processed via EAE are located in Social Security Unified Measurement Systems (SUMS).

I. Exhibit — SSN handout provided to Immigrant at DoS Visa interview

This is an exhibit of the DoS handout provided to aliens issued immigrant visas.

 

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS FOR U.S. PERMANENT RESIDENTS

 

We are pleased you intend to immigrate to the United States. Upon admission to the United States based on your immigrant visa, you will be a U.S. permanent resident. Each permanent resident needs a Social Security Number (SSN). An SSN will help you to work in the United States, to conduct business with a bank or financial institution, to pay your taxes or to be listed as a dependent on a tax return, and for other purposes.

 

If You Requested a Social Security Number When You Applied for Your Visa

 

If you, or your parents or proper applicant, requested an SSN card as part of your visa application, U.S. Department of State (DoS), Form DS 230, Part II, Questions 43a and 43b, when you arrive in the United States, the U.S. DoS and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will share with us the information needed to issue you an SSN card. Therefore, you do not need to fill out a special application or go to a Social Security office to get an SSN.

 

We will assign you an SSN and issue you a Social Security card after you arrive in the United States. If you already have an SSN, we will issue you a replacement SSN card. We will mail your SSN card to the U.S. mailing address where the Department of Homeland Security will send your Permanent Resident Card. You should receive your Social Security card within 3 weeks after you arrive.

 

IMPORTANT: Call us if you do not receive your Social Security card after 3 weeks or if you change your mailing address after arrival in the United States. If you call us, please have this letter with you. It will help us answer your questions.

 

If You Did Not Request a Social Security Number When You Applied for Your Visa

 

You must come to a Social Security office to apply for an SSN if you did not request an SSN card as part of your visa application when you arrive in the United States. When you have a permanent address, please call us to find out where to apply for an SSN card.

 

When you visit a Social Security office to apply for a Social Security card, take the following papers with you:

  • Your passport with your Machine-Readable Immigrant Visa (MRIV) or Permanent Resident Card (Form I-551) if you have it, and

  • Your birth certificate and a birth certificate for each member of your family applying for a Social Security number.

 

If you are applying for a replacement card you will only need your passport with your MRIV or Permanent Resident Card (Form I-551), if you have received it.

 

A Social Security representative will help you complete the application. You should receive your SSN card within 2 weeks after we have everything we need to process your application. If we need to verify any document you show us, it may take longer.

 

Additional Information

 

The information you give us for getting an SSN is confidential. This means that we do not share your information except as provided for under the law. For example, we may share information with other government agencies as permitted under the Privacy Act. For more information about this, please contact us.

 

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