SI BOS01120.200 Grantor Trusts (RTN 263 - 12/2009)

A. Background

In order to evaluate a trust under the SSI program it is crucial to determine the following:

  • the grantor or grantors of the trust

  • the beneficiary or beneficiaries of the trust; and

  • whether the trust is irrevocable.

For trusts established prior to 1/1/00, consult SI 01120.200D to make the appropriate resource determination for all trusts, including irrevocable grantor trusts. For trusts established by an individual on or after 1/1/00, refer to SI 01120.201D.

B. Grantor Trust

Subject to state law, a grantor trust is a trust in which the grantor of the trust is also the sole beneficiary of the trust. See SI 01120.200B.2 for who may be a grantor.

C. Determinations of Irrevocability of Grantor Trusts

1. Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Vermont

The Regional Office of General Counsel (RGC) has determined that in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Vermont a grantor trust is irrevocable if the trust document states that it is irrevocable, and the trust property will be left to a residual beneficiary upon the principal beneficiary's death or the occurrence of some specific event. In these states, residual beneficiaries are assumed to be created, absent evidence of contrary intent, when a grantor names heirs, next of kin, or similar groups to receive the remaining assets in the trust upon the grantor's death.

Examples of acceptable designations of residual beneficiaries are: Upon the death of John Smith (the beneficiary of John Smith Trust) the trust property will go to “Fred Smith and Mary Smith,” to “John Smith's brother or sister,” to “John Smith's heirs,” to “heirs at law,” to “next of kin,” survivors, to “the Vermont Association of Retarded Citizens,” or to “the State's General Fund.”

2. Massachusetts

The RGC has determined that a grantor trust is irrevocable as long as the grantor/beneficiary does not reserve the right to revoke, alter, or amend the trust (i.e. the trust document stipulates that only the trustee may revoke, alter, or amend the trust and there is no language giving the grantor/beneficiary those rights). This rule applies as long as there is no evidence that the trust grantor/beneficiary relinquished his/her rights because of diminished mental capacity, fraud, mistake, or undue influence. It is not necessary that a residual beneficiary be named for a grantor trust to be considered irrevocable.

Generally, trust language will be clear as to the grantor's/beneficiary's rights to revoke, alter or amend the trust.

3. New Hampshire

For trusts created prior to October 1, 2004, a trust is irrevocable if the grantor/beneficiary does not reserve a right to revoke, alter or amend the trust.

Effective October 1, 2004, New Hampshire enacted the Uniform Trust Code. Under this statute, a New Hampshire grantor trust created October 1, 2004, or later is presumed to be irrevocable if it states that it is irrevocable despite the lack of a residual beneficiary.

The New Hampshire Uniform Trust Code allows for the termination of an irrevocable trust created on or after October 1, 2004, under certain circumstances. A court may approve termination of a trust if all the beneficiaries consent to the termination, and if the court finds that continuation of the trust is not necessary to achieve any material purpose of the trust. In addition, a grantor could also request the termination of a trust with no residual beneficiary. However, the ability of the grantor to request the termination of the trust does not make the trust a countable resource. The trust will be considered a resource at the time the court honors the request and orders the termination of the trust.

4. Maine

For grantor trusts established in Maine prior to July 1, 2005, follow the same rules as set out for Connecticut, Rhode Island and Vermont in SI BOS01120.200C.1. to determine whether a trust is irrevocable. A trust established prior to July 1, 2005, is generally considered irrevocable if the document states that it is irrevocable and if the trust property would be left to a residual beneficiary upon the principal beneficiary's death or the occurrence of some specific event.

For grantor trusts executed on or after July 1, 2005, a trust is irrevocable if stated to be irrevocable, regardless of whether a residual beneficiary is named.

The Maine Uniform Trust Code also provides for the termination of an irrevocable trust created on or after J